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News / #NationWISE: Supporting Women in Solar Energy

Be there or be square. Check out this amazing solar networking event on Feb 24th that is bringing solar supporters (women AND men) together all across the country for one day. Microgrid is proud to have many employees and solar friends as featured speakers. You will want to be part of this day! RSVP here.

From Heidi Schoen, Executive Director of MOSIEA:

Women in Solar Energy (WISE) is a national nonprofit aimed at advancing women in solar and related fields. As the national conversation about family leave has resurfaced in the media, they want to investigate how the solar industry, a progressive workforce, can do a better job of recruiting and retaining women. A recent survey of the industry revealed that women only make up about 20% of the solar market and there is almost no data on the HR practices of solar companies around the country. As this workforce grows at such a fast a pace, the solar industry is in a unique position to lead the way on women’s issues.

Join us at Urban Chestnut on the evening of Tuesday, February 24th from 6-8pm to participate in our #NationWISE discussion. We’ll be featuring 4 local speakers and have invited many local employees to the event. To sign up here for free (or for $15 suggested donation), click here.

From SolWomen.org:

According to The Solar Foundation’s 2013 annual job census, the solar industry is generally diverse, but women and racial and ethnic minorities make up a smaller share of the solar workforce than in the overall U.S. economy.

SOLAR HAS A 28.23% POINT DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WOMEN IN SOLAR COMPARED TO WOMEN IN THE BROADER US ECONOMY, BY FAR THE LARGEST GAP IN PERCENTAGE OF ABLE WORKERS BY COMPARISON.

At 18.7%, women are better represented in the solar industry than they are nationally in construction (12%) and “Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction” (16%), but less so than manufacturing (28%). 15 While women are still largely underrepresented, their role in all aspects of the value chain cannot be underestimated.

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